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London Restaurant Festival is a sign of the capital's food-booming times

Britain's capital has undergone a food revolution in recent years, and the city's residents are embracing the trend

London has undergone something of a food revolution in recent years, with the 2014 Zagat London Restaurant Survey placing the city on par with New York and Paris as a dining destination.

With an influx of barbecue grills, extravagant burger bars and quirky diners that combine the likes of champagne and hot dogs, the boom in fancy yet affordable options for eating out is clear - and now the London Restaurant Festival has given the capital's food scene something else to shout about.

The London restaurant festivities

Running from October 3rd to 21st, the event is designed to draw people's attention to the rich cultural diversity of the city's culinary offerings.

The "Japanese Journey" has already sold out the first of its four dates, which see diners visit six different restaurants - including inamo in Soho and Tonkotsu in the West End - to indulge in a range of drinks and dishes.

The Tapas Tour works on the same principle, with people buying tickets that can exchanged for the delights offered by establishments such as Mayfair's El Pirata and Barrica in nearby Goodge Street.

Traditional twists

Given that one thing which unites many of these establishments is their emphasis on providing quality food at an affordable price, it's easy to see why they're becoming ever-more popular

While there's no doubting the popularity of these initiatives, the events that are most in demand are Sunday lunch specials that will be cooked by some of the country's top chefs.

Theo Randall has sold out InterContinental, while three of the other participants - including Marianne Lumb - have also had all the tickets for their respective events snapped up.

Restaurant revolution

The sellouts are encouraging - and what's impressive about the festival is that it's not a corporate gimmick or cheap marketing drive. While it undeniably helps to garner attention for the restaurants, it's also a widespread initiative designed to encourage people to enjoy new food experiences.

The popularity of the events reflects the resurgence the capital is seeing in the number of people who are eating out, and highlights the opportunities that are currently on offer in the city's hospitality industry.

And given that one thing which unites many of these establishments is their emphasis on providing quality food at an affordable price, it's easy to see why they're becoming ever-more popular.

If the capital's food revolution continues to gather momentum, Zagat's claim that London is up there with Paris and New York on the culinary scale could well prove to be bang on the money.

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